Archives for the month of: September, 2013

Male hormone replacement therapy may have heart benefits

Many birth control pills contain estrogen in combination with progestin, while estrogen-only HRT contains only estrogens. Some studies suggest that hormone replacement therapy reduces blood sugar levels and diabetes risk, two factors that may be important in the development of pancreatic cancer. These effects were seeen for both types of studies hormone replacement therapy . But one study suggested that, while estrogen-only HRT is linked with reduced levels of insulin (a hormone that regulates blood sugar), the addition of progestin to the therapy countered this effect on insulin. Another study found that use of oral contraception that contained both estrogen and progestin is linked to increased insulin levels. More research into how estrogen and progestin effect pancreatic cancer risk is needed, the researchers said.
For the original version including any supplementary images or video, visit http://www.foxnews.com/health/2013/09/13/hormone-replacement-therapy-may-reduce-pancreatic-cancer-risk/

Hormone therapy: Is it right for you?

I WISH THAT 20 YEARS AGO THAT MY FATHER WOULD HAVE BEEN ABLE TO DO THE SAME THING. AND IT’S IMPORTANT TO REMEMBER, HORMONE REPLACEMENT CAN HAVE ADVERSE SIDE EFFECTS. YOU NEED TO BE SURE TO GO THROUGH THE NECESSARY TESTS BEFORE BEGINNING THIS TYPE OF THERAPY. WOW. MAYBE IT WILL WORK FOR SOME MEN. I HOPE SO.
For the original version including any supplementary images or video, visit http://www.clickorlando.com/news/male-hormone-replacement-therapy-may-have-heart-benefits/-/1637132/22037990/-/ic3m13z/-/index.html

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What are the risks of hormone therapy? In the largest clinical trial to date, a combination estrogen-progestin pill (Prempro) increased the risk of certain serious conditions, including: Heart disease Blood clots Breast cancer A related clinical trial evaluating estrogen alone (Premarin) in women who previously had a hysterectomy found no increased risk of breast cancer or heart disease. The risks of stroke and blood clots were similar to the combination therapy. Hormone therapy, particularly estrogen combined with a progestin, can make your breasts look more dense on mammograms, making breast cancer more difficult to detect.
For the original version including any supplementary images or video, visit http://edition.cnn.com/HEALTH/library/hormone-therapy/WO00046.html

Hormone therapy: Is it right for you?

In the study, women from California who took estrogen-only hormone replacement therapy for symptoms of menopause were 41 percent less likely to develop pancreatic cancer over a 14-year period than women who never took hormone replacement therapy. Estrogen-only hormone replacement therapy (HRT) contains the female hormone estrogen by itself, as opposed to in combination with other hormones, such as progestin. Because estrogen by itself may increase the risk of uterine cancer, estrogen-only HRT is generally prescribed only to women who’ve had their uterus removed (a hysterectomy). However, in contrast to the results with estrogen-only HRT, the study also found another type of estrogen-containing medication birth control pills were linked with an increased risk of pancreatic cancer when used over the long term.
For the original version including any supplementary images or video, visit http://www.foxnews.com/health/2013/09/13/hormone-replacement-therapy-may-reduce-pancreatic-cancer-risk/

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Women who have had their uterus removed (hysterectomy) don’t need to take progestin. What are the risks of hormone therapy? In the largest clinical trial to date, a combination estrogen-progestin pill (Prempro) increased the risk of certain serious conditions, including: Heart disease Blood clots Breast cancer A related clinical trial evaluating estrogen alone (Premarin) in women who previously had a hysterectomy found no increased risk of breast cancer or heart disease. The risks of stroke and blood clots were similar to the combination therapy.
For the original version including any supplementary images or video, visit http://www.cnn.com/HEALTH/library/hormone-therapy/WO00046.html

Hormone replacement therapy formulations may cause different risks for stroke, heart attack

“If confirmed by future randomized trials, these findings may be significant because for the past decade, many women who experienced severe menopause symptoms opted not to use hormone therapy because of the reported increased risk of stroke and heart attacks,” said Chrisandra Shufelt, MD, director of the Women’s Hormone and Menopause Program at the Barbra Streisand Women’s Heart Center in the Cedars-Sinai Heart Institute. Shufelt said the study’s findings are not conclusive and are based on observational follow-up, not a randomized clinical trial. Additionally, all types of hormone therapy had similar rates of total cardiovascular outcomes and all-cause mortality, the study showed. The similarities in results across formulations were greater than the differences. Following a 2002 study by the Women’s Health Initiative (WHI), a randomized clinical trial sponsored by the National Heart, Lung, and Blood Institute that tied hormone replacement therapy to an increased risk for heart disease and stroke, many women avoided hormone therapy altogether.
For the original version including any supplementary images or video, visit http://www.news-medical.net/news/20130920/Hormone-replacement-therapy-formulations-may-cause-different-risks-for-stroke-heart-attack.aspx

Two hundred and fifty-six women developed gestational diabetes; 497 did not. Among the normal-weight women, low levels of adiponectin also corresponded to whether they got gestational diabetes, though the incidence was lower: They were only about 4 times as likely as women with normal levels of the hormone. Simpler, cheaper technique for test-tube babies “Low adiponectin levels were linked with gestational diabetes even for women without traditional diabetes risk factors such as being overweight, so this could be an important clinical marker for women who may become pregnant,” Hedderson said. “Adiponectin testing early in pregnancy may also help identify high-risk women who would benefit from early diagnosis and treatment of gestational diabetes.” The relationship between low hormone levels and a higher diabetes risk increased with higher body mass indexes or BMI even after adjusting for such factors as a family history of diabetes, race, smoking and blood glucose and insulin levels, according a statement about the study. The participants were diverse in terms of race, ethnicity and education, but might have been more health conscious because they had volunteered to take part in health check-up exams. Hedderson said that more research was needed to determine whether changes in diet and physical activity could increase levels of adiponectin, which also protects against inflammation and heart disease. 2013 CBS Interactive Inc.
For the original version including any supplementary images or video, visit http://www.cbsnews.com/8301-204_162-57600676/hormone-levels-predict-risk-of-diabetes-in-pregnant-women/

In Diabetes, Any Protein in Urine May Signal Heart Risk

However, although an association was noted between albuminuria and heart troubles, the study did not prove cause and effect. The researchers also looked at a subgroup of patients who took high blood pressure drugs called ACE inhibitors from the start of the study and throughout the follow-up period. There was no link between albumin excretion levels and heart risks in this group. This suggests that ACE inhibitors may help protect the hearts of both diabetes patients with albuminuria and those with normal albumin levels, Dr. Giuseppe Remuzzi, of the Mario Negri Institute for Pharmacological Research in Bergamo, and colleagues said in a news release from the American Society of Nephrology. Further research is needed to determine the levels of albumin excretion that warrant treatment with heart-protective drugs, the study authors said. — Robert Preidt Copyright 2012 HealthDay .
For the original version including any supplementary images or video, visit http://www.medicinenet.com/script/main/art.asp?articlekey=161989

Gestational Diabetes Risk Pointed Out With Pre-Pregnancy Hormone Testing

This study included women who volunteered to participate in Kaiser Permanente’s multiphasic health check up exam, therefore the population may be more health conscious than the general population. However, the study cohort was very diverse in terms of race-ethnicity and education level. Gestational diabetes, or glucose intolerance during pregnancy, is common and can lead to adverse outcomes including larger-than-normal babies and subsequent delivery complications. Women with gestational diabetes are seven times more likely to develop type 2 diabetes later in life, and their children are at greater risk of becoming obese and developing diabetes themselves. “Low adiponectin levels were linked with gestational diabetes even for women without traditional diabetes risk factors such as being overweight, so this could be an important clinical marker for women who may become pregnant.
For the original version including any supplementary images or video, visit http://www.medindia.net/news/gestational-diabetes-risk-pointed-out-with-pre-pregnancy-hormone-testing-124390-1.htm